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FRAME

FORECASTING AND ASSESSING EUROPE’S
STRATEGIC RAW MATERIALS NEEDS

Objectives

Unlike “more common metals” such as copper, zinc, lead and iron, many CRM do not form the main commodity (-ies) produced from operating mines, but are instead recovered as by-products (‘companion metals’) of the primary ores at some stage during processing. Europe has a rich and diverse mineral endowment including CRM, and a map showing the distribution of selected CRM deposits of Europe, based on the ProMine database was published by EGS’s Mineral Resources Expert Group during 2016 and an updated version base on the new CRM list was delivered in December 2017. Despite these efforts, there is still need for a more comprehensive pan-European identification and compilation of mineral potential and metallogenic areas of CRM. Such metallogenic areas can be defined by the presence of mineral occurrences and deposits, past and active mines, previous and ongoing exploration activities, favorable bedrock geology, geophysical signatures, geochemistry and predictive/prospectivity mapping.

The present project will build on previously and currently developed pan-European and national databases, and expand the strategic and CRM knowledge trough a compilation of mineral potential and metallogenic areas of critical raw materials resources in Europe, focused on related metal associations on land and the marine environment. Secondary resources, in terms of historical mining wastes and potential by-products will also be considered. The mineral resources targeted will have to extend beyond the current EU CRM list and include also minerals and metals (e.g. lithium, copper, and manganese) that are strategic for the European downstream industry in the mid- and long-term perspective.

To develop metallogenic research and models at regional and deposit scales, with special attention to strategic critical minerals for which the EU is highly dependent, in support of more efficient exploration and mining the following specific objectives need to be addressed:

• Identify and define the strategic minerals and metals that will make part of the metallogenetic map and related interpretations, focused on the current list of CRM, but considering also the strategic importance of some of those which were among the original candidates, such as phosphate rock, lithium, graphite, cobalt, niobium, tantalum, and others such as selenium, silver, copper, manganese, lead and iron ore. All minerals and metals collected and selected to be part of the metallogenetic map will simply go under the term CRM.

• Produce a metallogenetic map and increase the knowledge on the CRM endowments and resource potential in Europe and EU seas, based on,

– Mineralisations and deposits on land and the marine environment in which CRM make the main commodities, e.g. REE minerals related to carbonatite, nepheline syenites, pegmatites or paleoplacers, tungsten deposits related to granites, lithium feasible pegmatites, graphite hosted by schists.

– Mineralisations and deposits on land and the marine environment in which CRM make associated commodities, e.g. REE in bauxite deposits and manganese nodules; cobalt in nickel deposits and ferromanganese crusts; vanadium in iron-titanium deposits;, indium and tellurium in VMS and epithermal gold deposits

– Secondary resources, in terms of historical and modern mineral-based mining wastes (waste rocks, processing tailings, metallurgical residues) and by-products, e.g. REE in apatite concentrates related to iron extraction and red mud derived from alumina refining; indium in the waste streams of lead-zinc sulphide mining.

• Better understanding of the ore genetic links between major deposit types and hosted critical mineral and metal associations. Understanding also the mineralizing processes in different environments, including current deep sea, and using this understanding to predict and develop new mineral deposits or deposit types. This research also involves the characterization of ores, rocks, primary and secondary deposits etc. for significant elements and minerals, whose importance has increased and/or which represent cases where the occurrence is poorly understood or constrained. This objective and target will be interlinked and interactive with the tasks undertaken and the achievements resulted from GeoERA RM3 Metallogeny that will address the main deposit types and commodities.

• Be able to identify conditions and processes involved in the formation of the STR and CRM-potential deposits and develop conceptual models for their formation. 

• Predictive targeting based on GIS exploration tools, of high potential mineral provinces and mining districts.

• Provide potential CRM resource estimates based on the UNECE classification system in close cooperation with RM 1/WP 5 on UNCF system.

• Display and distribute the map and description on the Information platform.

• Highlight mineral resources criticality to high-tech economy and downstream sectors.

This project will collect and act as a source of mineral information data that will support the continuous work going on in the DG-Grow, Raw Materials Supply Group and the Ad Hoc Working Group on Criticality of the EU commission.

Relation to existing programmes and projects:

European projects including the CRM dimension are M4EU, EuRare, ProSUM, ProMine and SCRREEN. An important output from the M4EU project is the European minerals knowledge data platform (EUMKDP) and the Minerals Yearbook. The ProSUM project which has just finished at year end 17 delivered the EU Urban Mine Knowledge Data Platform (EU-UMKDP), including also mining wastes. There are also national projects going on targeting the ore potential of CRM at country level. EuRare has compiled an overview of REE metallogenetic belts in Europe. However, no pan-European map of major metallogenic provinces for a suite of CRM has been published.

Budget and participants

Total funding requested: 932471.61€
Total in-kind contribution: 2207162.87€

The total budget breakdown per partner is as in the table below:

Work package 1 – Project Coordination
Lead: LNEG
Contact: Daniel de Oliveira
daniel.oliveira@lneg.pt

Work package 2 – Communication, Dissemination and Exploitation
Lead: LNEG

Work package 3 – Critical and Strategic Raw Materials Map of Europe
Lead: SGU

Work package 4 – Critical Raw Materials in phosphate deposits, and associated black shales
Lead: RBINS

Work package 5 – Energy Critical Elements
Lead: NGU

Work package 6 – Conflict free Nb-Ta for the EU
Lead: SGU

Work package 7 – Historical mining sites revisited
Lead: BRGM

Work package 8 – Link to Information Platform
Lead: LNEG

Project Philosophy

Europe shows an inevitably growing and accelerating consumption of mineral commodities. At the moment the question whether supply to meet these demands is adequate or not cannot be answered with any certainty because secure supply is a matter of knowing the resources and the ability to exploit them with respect to sustainability.

It is well established and broadly accepted by now that non-energy minerals underpin our modern economy. They are essential for manufacturing and renewable “green” energy supply. Most of the environmental technologies and applications (e.g. wind turbines, photovoltaic cells, electric and hybrid vehicles) allowing energy production from renewable resources will use, so called, high-tech metals (e.g. Rare Earth Elements (REE), Platinum Group Elements (PGE), niobium, lithium, cobalt, indium, gallium, vanadium, tellurium, selenium) that were derived or refined from minerals, which Europe is strongly import dependent on. More specific, industrial trends, particularly clean and carbon-reducing technologies, are disrupting traditional metal sectors, with a robust drive in the development of battery-raw material metals. We need to calculate the volumes of critical and potentially strategic metals (e.g. cobalt, niobium, vanadium, antimony, PGE and REE) and minerals that are currently not extracted in Europe. We further need to understand how high-tech elements are mobilised, where they occur and why some are associated with specific major industrial metals.

The high import dependence of strategic (STR) and critical raw materials (CRM) has a serious impact on the sustainability of the EU manufacturing industry. This problem can only be solved by more intense and advanced exploration for new mineral deposits on land and the marine environment. Seafloor mineral resources receive growing European interest with respect to the exploration potential of REE, cobalt, selenium, tellurium and other high-tech metals.

Figure 1 – Map of the global supply of EU critical materials.

Many critical minerals and metals may be collected through recycling of mining related waste materials. However, even with the important contribution from recycling, to secure resource efficient supply it will still be necessary to extract primary mineral deposits, focusing on applying new technologies for deep exploration and mining, turning low- grade ores to exploitable resources and reducing generation of mining wastes and large tailings by converting them to exploitable resources and solving environmental footprint and land-use challenges.

As well as the dependence on extra-EU supply concerns (Fig. 1), the production of many materials is reliant on a few countries. This concentration of supply also poses concern as these few countries dominate supply of individual or several materials: Brazil (niobium), USA (beryllium), South Africa (platinum), DRC (cobalt) and China (REE, antimony, magnesium, and tungsten). Twenty countries are the largest suppliers of the CRM contributing with 90% of supply. All major suppliers of the individual critical raw materials fall within this group of twenty countries (Fig. 1). At the same time all are predicted to experience demand growth, with lithium, niobium, gallium and heavy rare earth element forecast to have the strongest rates of demand growth, exceeding 8% per year for the rest of the decade. In addition, Russia is known to have an active programme on materials stockpiles and export restrictions, China has from time to time tightened the export quotas for REE ostensibly to secure internal supply, and the US has long had a stockpile for strategic defense materials.

Figure 2 – Critical Raw Material deposits of Europe map; 2017 edition – updated after release of CRM list 11/2017.

There is a need on exploration focus by challenging more effective CRM exploration and better understanding of their metallogenetic setting and mineral potential. Discovery of new STR and CRM resources needs enhanced information on surface and subsurface geology, new concepts of mineral resource potential, particularly in underexplored areas of limited geological knowledge and projects facilitating the need to span the geosciences and be truly multidisciplinary. The question about “where are undiscovered critical mineral resources likely to exist, and how much undiscovered mineral resource may be present” needs to be answered. All of the processes involved in the formation of a CRM deposit type, a good understanding of why CRM mineral deposits occur where they do (Fig. 2), ore exploration models and resource assessment studies, make significant steps to be taken. Irrespective of the CRM exploration potential level, better understanding of the geology and metallogeny, and delivery of high-quality CRM maps may lead to new or little-known types of CRM ore deposits and ore-forming systems. In addition, future CRM exploration will likely need to focus increasingly on blind deposits. The European Union has recognized these challenges and has reacted since 2008 with its Raw Materials Initiative, following Communications (COM(2008) 699 final; COM(2011) 25 final;) and the List of Critical Raw materials. Many National Geological Surveys have supported the European Commission in identifying potential bottlenecks on CRM as well as providing information how to overcome physical shortages. However, all these activities are punctual, on individual basis and hence, not lasting.

Work Packages

Work package 1

Objectives
The purpose of work package 1 is to lead, manage, coordinate and monitor the progress of the project, and ensure that the project meets the objectives stated for the work described in the Grant Agreement and that WP leaders and partners respect the timeline and deliverables.

Work package 2

Objectives
The objective of WP 2 is to widely disseminate the project results during the duration of the project as well as to maximize its impacts after the end of the project. WP 2 will focus in developing and implementing a comprehensive communication strategy plan that will define the project multiple stakeholders and the most suitable channels to reach them. WP 2 will support the technical and management project Work Packages in communicating their research in an understandable way for scientific and no-scientific audiences. In particular, WP 2 will:

• Disseminate information on the project, its progress and results to the wider community operating in the field of Forecasting and assessing Europe’s Strategic Raw Materials needs in the EU and beyond, including national, local, regional public authorities, other interested third parties and the general public.

• Ensure that the project benefits are clearly and systematically promoted, and foster a two-way dialogue with stakeholders.

• Raise awareness and visibility on the importance of improving Europe’s framework conditions for Forecasting and assessing Europe’s Strategic Raw Materials needs (FRAME).

• Foster the connection with existing EU and Member States initiatives and projects relevant to the Project outcomes.

Work package 3

Objectives
To develop metallogenic research and models at regional and deposit scales as well as prospectivity maps, with special attention to strategic critical minerals for which the EU is highly dependent, in support of more efficient exploration and mining the following specific objectives need to be addressed:

• Identify and define the strategic minerals and metals that will make part of the metallogenetic map and related interpretations, focused on the current list of CRM, but considering also the strategic importance of some of those which were among the original candidates, such as lithium, tellurium, selenium, silver, iron ore and others. All minerals and metals collected and selected to be part of the metallogenetic map will simply go under the term CRM. 

• Produce metallogenetic map and increase the knowledge on the CRM endowments and resource potential in Europe and EU seas.

• Better understanding of the ore genetic links between major deposit types and hosted critical mineral and metal associations. Understanding also the mineralizing processes in different environments, including Europe’s deep sea areas, and using this understanding to find and develop new mineral deposits or deposit types.

• Be able to identify conditions and processes involved in the formation of the CRM-potential deposits and develop conceptual models for their formation.

• Predictive targeting based on GIS exploration tools, of high potential mineral provinces and mining districts.

• Provide potential CRM resources estimates based on the UNECE classification system European scale prospectivity maps were produced 5 years ago by the ProMine project, using a relatively basic approach (Weight of Evidence, for most of them). They deserve to be improved using a more appropriate methodology for a continental scale approach and considering the latest (2017) CRM list. The main objective of the present task is to produce a renewed and updated set of continental scale mineral prospectivity maps, covering all EU member states and neighbouring countries (Ukraine, Balkans, Norway, Switzerland, etc.), (according to the 2017 CRM list from the European Commission, and based on the availability of data, i.e. known mineral deposits of targeted commodities). These prospectivity assessments will benefit from the latest developments in “data driven” mineral prospectivity methods that allow mapping at continental scale (i.e., CBA, or “Cell Based Association” method developed by BRGM).

• Display and distribute the map and description on the Information platform.

• Highlight mineral resources criticality to high-tech economy and downstream sectors.

Work package 4

Objectives
This work package (WP 4) “Critical Raw Materials in phosphate deposits, and associated black shales” is dedicated to the assessment of economic potential of igneous and sedimentary phosphate deposits (and their host black shales) in Europe, especially regarding Critical Raw Materials (CRM). These deposits could significantly contribute to a secure sustainable access to a large proportion of Europe’s requirement for these CRM.

This project proposal is therefore consistent with the SRT “RM4 – Forecasting and Assessing Europe’s Strategic Raw Materials Needs”. More precisely, this WP aims to provide an overview about phosphate mineralization (and associated economically interesting black shales). It will comprise detailed mineralogical and geochemical characterization of key phosphate deposits, sedimentary and igneous in origin. These metallogenic, mineralogical and geochemical studies will help to decipher the processes leading to CRM enrichment in these deposits. Since part of the phosphorites in Europe are hosted within metalliferous black shales, the latter will be considered as well, with the view of a combined and rational exploitation of these resources. Another aim is the development of a procedure to prepare and analyze samples from phosphate deposits. This would be helpful to provide internally consistent geochemical data at a European level for this type of mineralization. Finally, the data from the project will contribute to databases, such as those from Minerals4EU, the European Union Raw Materials Knowledge Base (EURMKB), SRT RM1, and the GeoERA Information Platform.

Despite the obvious interest, most phosphate deposits, and their host-rocks, have not been studied for some time (a few decades), especially with respect to their potential for CRM. The identification of the economic potential of phosphate deposits, whether they are of sedimentary or igneous origin, could significantly contribute to secure access to many elements listed as critical by the EC. The aim of this project is to provide an overview of phosphate mineralization (and economically interesting black shales) in Europe, with special emphasis on their CRM content. The project aims to identify new areas of interest for CRM.

More precisely, the objectives are:

• Mineralogical and geochemical data will be acquired on selected phosphate deposits and occurrences. WP partners have access to data and samples of phosphate deposits/occurrences (as well as host-rocks) within their respective countries. This will facilitate (1) the development of databases on these deposits, and (2) access to samples for mineralogical and geochemical studies.

• Investigate more carefully a selection of key phosphate deposits, which will be representative of the different types of phosphate mineralization encountered in Europe. The goal will be (i) to provide an up-to-date scientific overview about the genesis of phosphate deposits in Europe, (ii) to determine more clearly the potential for and speciation of CRM in phosphate deposits (and host metalliferous black shales), and (iii) to investigate the processes leading to their enrichment.

• Establish a procedure for sample preparation and analysis of phosphate samples with the objective of providing internally consistent geochemical data on a European level.

• An enhanced database will be developed, compiling data collected during this project and information from the literature and older databases. These data will be integrated into existing databases, such as Minerals4EU, the European Union Raw Materials Knowledge Base (EURMKB), SRT RM1, and the GeoERA Information Platform. They will also be available in map format.

The expertise of the partners in the fields of ore geology, mineralogy, and geochemistry, and access to relevant, state-of-the-art facilities (SEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, XRF, ICPMS) available at GSB, CGS will significantly contribute to achieving these goals. Most of the WP partners have been collaborating on these topics for several years through Expert Groups established by EuroGeoSurveys (MREG and GEEG) Moreover, some of the WP partners are already involved in national and international projects, the outcomes of which will contribute to the present WP. Examples include EuroGeoSource, Minventory, Minerals4EU, SCREEN (Solutions for Critical Raw Materials), MIREU (EU network of mining and metallurgy regions), and ORAMA (Optimising quality of information in Raw Materials data collection across Europe). The expertise of, and cooperation between the partners will be further developed within this project.

Work package 5

Objectives
Natural graphite, lithium and cobalt are essential components in modern and mobile energy storage technology, most notably in rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. The current work package will investigate, generate and compile data on the occurrence and production of these “energy critical elements” in order to provide a better and more accurate basis for exploration and exploitation, as well as land use management, and to provide high quality mineral intelligence data to the European data portals. Natural graphite and cobalt are both critical raw materials in the 2017 EU criticality assessment, while lithium is located above the supply risk threshold.

The main application of natural graphite today is for refractories in the manufacture of steel and other metals. However, it is believed that the consumption for batteries will grow significantly over the coming years with increased electrification in the transport sector. Today natural graphite is produced in Norway, Austria and Ukraine, with Norway as the largest European supplier to the EU. In addition to Norway, The Czech Republic, Slovakia, Sweden and Finland are known to have potential for natural graphite. A pan-European compilation of resources, resource potentials, and geological data for natural graphite is essential in order to understand and assess the European potential for energy critical elements, and is a major objective in the work package.

The main application of Lithium today is for rechargeable batteries (Roskill 2016). Despite numerous European lithium ore deposits, used for ceramic industry needs, all batteries are made of non-European lithium. In Europe, lithium resources occur in several forms, including hard rock hosted and geothermal brines. Portugal, Spain, Austria, Finland, France, Czech Republic, Germany and Ireland among others, have high potential for Li-rich pegmatites and granites. Unknown/unconventional Li deposit types have not be considered, and a review of European Li ore deposit types & models is needed to improve mining exploration ore targeting. Knowledge on these resources (Minerals4EU, ProMine) are heterogeneous and considerably reduces the possibility for an exhaustive assessment of European reserves. The goal is first to complete existing databases and to extend them by the use of data augmentation. A second objective is to estimate the lithium reserves, of all types in Europe.

In the global perspective, cobalt is typically produced as byproduct of nickel production; the only significant exception to this rule is the deposits in the southernmost Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) where cobalt is predominantly associated with copper mineralizations. Globally, economical cobalt deposits can be classified to three major types: 1) lateritic Ni-Co ores, 2) certain cobalt-enriched sedimentary rock-hosted copper deposits (only in DRC), and 3) mafic-ultramafic rock associated sulphidic Ni-Cu-PGE ores. Finland is currently the only EU country producing cobalt from its mines. In the entire Europe, also Russia has mine production of cobalt, from the Pechenga nickel mines. All countries producing nickel do have potential to also produce cobalt, as these two metals overwhelmingly occur in same ore minerals. However for the entire Europe, the mine production data available indicate no cobalt production in countries producing nickel: including Albania, Greece, Kosovo, Macedonia, Norway, Poland, and Spain. That these countries do not recover cobalt from their mined nickel ores suggests challenges in ore processing/recovery and/or insignificant cobalt concentrations in the ore, causing processing to be uneconomical. Globally significant cobalt refining has been done in Finland for decades. During years 1997−2003, Finland was even the largest cobalt refiner in the world. After that, China took over the leading position, but Finland is still the second biggest refiner globally. Annual refined cobalt production in Finland has ranged between 8 000 – 12 500 tpa.

Work package 6

Objectives
The chemically related elements niobium (Nb) and tantalum (Ta) are two of the most particular critical metals (critical raw materials; CRM), of which Ta, and associated Nb are extensively sourced as so-called conflict mineral from the central African region today. As such, their mine production is associated with abhorrent and often slave-like conditions for mine workers, which include children, as well as being a fundamental source of income for local warlords. While legislation is now in part being enforced to “guarantee” conflict-free Nb and Ta in industrial products, this is very far from being without major caveats. An alternative, or complimentary action to this, is to find potential sources of these rare metals within the EU and associated countries.

The main objectives of this WP are therefore to do a survey of the pan-European distribution of the conflict metals Nb-Ta and also enhance their exploration interest and potential in order to produce them ethically and indigenous to the Community. The deposits will be classified based on genetic type and subdivided as to timing of formation and regional distribution. As far as possible, the detailed ore mineralogy of Nb-Ta will be collated and described for the assessed deposits/mineralisations, to maximise the usefulness with regards to processing and associated evaluation parameters of their economic potential. Potential by-products, not least of other critical or strategic metals and minerals will be taken into account. This survey and its outcomes will also form the basis for developing recommendations for future exploration for these metals in Europe. Another important objective is to discuss and make draft recommendations for future projects to improve conditions for Nb-Ta and other CRM production in central Africa.

Work package 7

Objectives
The project aims at improving European regional geological and metallogenic knowledge regarding future potential of existing mine sites and will contribute to improving pan-European geological information on CRM by providing an overview and case studies on critical raw materials contained in known European deposits while focus will be given to former highly and longtime active mining regions.

The project will feed site-specific data of ore deposits with CRM potential into the pan-European knowledge base on raw materials and thus broaden the understanding of the raw material potential in Europe (including secondary raw materials from mine wastes).

The project will generate data and additional information which will be harvested into the GeoERA Information Platform and contributes also to the improvement of transparent information flow and general knowledge improvement.

Information provided by the project can contribute to special planning topics and ensure an integration of raw material potential into future land use and policy planning and thus to the optimal use and sustainable management of the subsurface.

Knowledge generated in the project can be used as an additional source of information by European, national and regional policy makers, industry and other stakeholders.

Work package 8

Objectives
The main objective is to identify and discuss requirements in close dialogue with the Information platform (IP) team.

Furthermore, this work-package is to ensure that the principles and guidelines provided by the GIP-project is followed and implemented.

Facilitate that the information generated is provided to the improvement of the European Union Raw Materials Knowledge Base (EURMKB), as crucial input to the minerals yearbook and inventory information system (RM1), and ensure the information uploaded to the EGDI repository and extensions.

Please click here for  an example of the user interface of EGDI.

News/Events

FRAME is present at the Raw Materials Week in Brussels

Daniel Oliveira (LNEG) project coordinator of FRAME.

Klemen Teran (Geological Survey of Slovenia) next to the FRAME poster.

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FRAME Newsletter

Issue 1 | October 2018

FRAME @ the EuroGeoSurveys Directors’ Workshop, Bratislava

FRAME Project was represented at the 45th EuroGeoSurveys Directors‘ Workshop that took place in Bratislava on the 17 October 2018. The project generated much interest amongst the representatives in attendance because it deals with the next set of data that the European Commission needs because it handles aspects of the Circular Economy, the Critical Raw Materials and the Battery Initiative.

Progress Report of FRAME WP5 Energy Critical Elements

By Håvard Gautneb (NGU, Norway), Eric Gloaguen (BRGM, France) and Tuomo Törmänen (GTK, Finland)

The main application of natural graphite today is for refractories in the manufacture of steel and other metals. However, it is believed that the consumption for batteries will grow significantly over the coming years with increased electrification in the transport sector. Today natural graphite is produced in Norway, Austria and Ukraine, with Norway as the largest European supplier to the EU. In addition to Norway, The Czech Republic, Slovakia, Sweden and Finland are known to have potential for natural graphite.

The main application of Lithium today is for rechargeable batteries. Despite numerous European lithium ore deposits, used for ceramic industry needs, all batteries are made of non-European lithium.

In Europe, lithium resources occur in several forms, including hard rock hosted and geothermal brines. Portugal, Spain, Austria, Finland, France, (Fig. 1) Czech Republic, Germany and Ireland among others, have high potential for Li-rich pegmatites and granites.

Unknown/unconventional Li deposit types have not been considered, and a review of European Li ore deposit types & models is needed to improve mining, exploration, and ore targeting.

In the global perspective, cobalt is typically produced as byproduct of nickel production; the only significant exception to this rule is the deposits in the southernmost Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) where cobalt is predominantly associated with copper mineralizations. Finland is currently the only EU country producing cobalt from its mines. In the entire Europe, also Russia has mine production of cobalt, from the Pechenga nickel mines.

Fig. 1 Chèdeville Lepidolite-petalite subtype LCT pegmatite (France). Aplites showing unidirectional solidification textures to the top, made of layers of fine-grained purple lepidolite and quartz alternating with layers of white coarse albite crystals. Avoid mass of lepidolite+quartz are also present on left top (hammer for scale). © E. Gloaguen – BRGM

Fig. 2 Lepidolite from the Gonçalo region in
northern Portugal.

All countries producing nickel do have potential to also produce cobalt, as these two metals overwhelmingly occur in same ore minerals. Globally significant cobalt refining has been done in Finland for decades. During years 1997−2003, Finland was the largest cobalt refiner in the world.

The work package 5 consists of the following partners: LNEG; BRGM, CGS, SGU, GSI, GTK, NGU GEOinform-GIU, IGR and GeoZS and they started by doing a first screening of occurrences in their respective countries. Per date (16.10.18) all partners except IGMEsp  have submitted data.

The data is grouped according to country and commodity as shown in the table 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1 – Occurrences of cobalt, graphite and lithium FRAME participating countries.

 

On a map over Europe the deposits are distributed as shown in Fig. 3

Fig. 3 distribution of occurrences of Co, Li and graphite in FRAME WP5 countries, status per 16.10.

Future work and challenges

Future work will have two major challenges:

  1. Only a minority of the EU35 countries are partners in this project a complete overview of the energy critical elements in Europe is not possible without data a as large part of EU 35 countries as possible.
  2. It will be important to integrate the data that has been collected in to a common information platform for GeoEra.

Apart from this, our start with WP5 seems promising and we hope that all partner will contribute to the project’s success.  The WP leads look forward to co-operate with everybody both internal and external people and institutions.

FRAME project in September’s issue of magazine “Mineral”

By Klemen Teran, Geological Survey of Slovenia

Aims and activities of FRAME project were presented to Slovenian professional public in September’s issue of magazine “Mineral”.  Article titled “Geological Service for Europe (GeoERA)” describes role and goals of GeoERA financial mechanism with focus on projects from the Raw Materials theme where Geological Survey of Slovenia (GeoZS) participates as a partner. Critical raw materials are not important only on European but also on national scale. Despite several important historical mining sites in Slovenia, there is not much data about trace elements which accompanying main ore minerals, which can be today of economic importance. FRAME addresses re-evaluation of historical mining sites as well as consistent collection of data dispersed in several databases or reports. This will contribute to the better knowledge about potential of specific ore deposits or will outline regions with the highest potential for mineral exploration. Results of FRAME project can form solid professional foundation for future re-development of metal mining activities in Slovenia.

Article (in Slovenian language) is accessible on:

https://www.mineral-revija.si/1875/Geoloska-sluzba-za-Evropo-(GeoERA)?cctest&src=XNASLZAD

Photogallery

FRAME Kick-Off meeting, Brussels 3-5 July

Members Area

A project folder for FRAME has been created on the GeoERA Intranet for sharing files.

(Please use the login credentials sent by email)

For more information please  contact us:

Monday - Friday
9h00 > 12h30 - 14h00 > 17h30

Phone: (+351) 210 924 630
Email: frame@lneg.pt

LNEG - Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia
Estrada da Portela, Bairro do Zambujal
Apartado 7586 – Alfragide
2610-999 Amadora
PORTUGAL

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